Zhi Shi Xie Bai Gui Zhi Tang
枳实薤白桂枝汤

 

 

Unripe Bitter Orange Chinese Garlic and Cinnamon Twig Decoction

 Disclaimer    For educational purposes only.  Do not use as medical advice

AboutHerbsCaution/Notes
Health Benefits
For: Cough • Chest Pain
Attributes:
Products (online examples)

Granules

Capsules

Granules

 

 

 

Research (sample)
Categories (Click on ⌕ for other formulas in the category)
Category: Clear Heat ⌕    Subcategory:  ⌕      Family:  ⌕      Source: Jin Gui Yao Lue  ⌕       Related Formula:
Actions
Expel Phlegm • Direct Qi downward • Unblock yang • Clear lumps
Indications and Contraindications
Appearance: Tongue -White, greasy      Pulse -Deep      Face/other 
Patterns:  
Indications:
Contraindications: Phlegm-heat chest pain • Not for long-term use
Properties
Data adapted from product found online.  Categories 4% or less not shown.

Herbs Cat/Dose Actions Properties
Gui ZhiCinnamon Twig • 桂枝 ♥ Release Exterior Wind Cold
6g
Regulate nutritive and protective qi • Warm channels • Expel Cold • Improve circulation • Relieve pain Antimicrobialanticoagulantteratogenic • emmenagogue • antiparasitic • antibiotic • hypoglycemic •analgesic • anti-inflammatory • antioxidant • free radical scavenging • sedative • memory enhancer
Hou PoMagnolia Bark • 厚朴 Transform Dampness
12g
Transform spleen dampness • Transform stomach dampness • Clear food stagnation • Transform Phlegm • Clear qi stagnation GABA-ergic • Sedative • Cannabimimetic • Antioxidant • Anticoagulant • Antidepressant • Anti-inflammatory • Antibiotic • Antispasmodic • Antitumor • Antimicrobial
Gua Lou 
12g
Xie Bai 
9g
Zhi Shi
12g
King/Chief    ♥ Minister/Deputy      Assistant     ♦ Envoy
Directions: 
Modifications For

Caution
ALERT: Contraindications of each herb - use with caution under these conditions:
Gui Zhi: Pregnancy • Liver Wind • Measles • Open skin sores
Hou Po: Anticoagulant drugs • Antidepressant drugs
:
Notes

 

Bibliography: [3], [8], [9], [14]

Information in this post came from many sources, including class notes, practitioners, websites, webinars, books, magazines, and editor's personal experience.  While the original source often came from historical Chinese texts,  variations may result from the numerous English translations.   Always consult a doctor prior to using these drugs.  The information here is strictly for educational purposes. 

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